Third Grade Basics

(The information below is based on standards from various states. If you need state specific standards, please search the internet for requirements for your state.)

Read on….or download here: Third Grade Basics

Also: For third grade reading/vocab list click here.

Mathematics

  • Identify Names of Numbers
    • Identify word names for numbers through 9,999.
    • Identify ordinals to 20th.
    • Identify even and odd numbers to 99.
  • Count, Sequence, and Compare Numbers
    • Count and write by 2’s, 3’s, 5’s, and 10’s to 100 starting at any point.
    • Sequence or order numbers through 9,999.
    • Identify a number greater than a given number in the thousands.
  • Use symbols and estimation
    • Recognize and use symbols: <, >, =
    • Estimate the sum of two 2-digit numbers.
  • Identify Place Value
    • Round 2-digit numerals to the nearest ten.
    • Identify place value up to 4 digits and expanded form up to 3 digits.
    • Compare whole numbers up to 4 digits.
    • Express a number as a number of tens and ones when the number of ones is greater than nine.
    • Round a number in hundredths to the nearest ten.
  • Add and Subtract
    • Add multi-digit numbers up to 3 digits.
    • Add a four digit number and a three digit number.
    • Subtract up to two 3-digit numbers.
    • Subtract a 1-digit number from a 2-digit number renaming tens to ones
    • Subtract a 2-digit number from a three digit number, renaming hundreds to tens.
    • Subtract a three digit number from a three digit number.
  • Multiply and Divide
    • Name the product for a multiplication fact given in horizontal or vertical form.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the terms multiplicand, multiplier, and product.
    • Complete a function table using multiplication facts.
    • Recall multiplication tables through fives.
    • Multiply 1-digit numbers and 1-digit by 2-digit numbers.
    • Use division facts 1-5 out of sequence.
  • Make Geometrical identifications
    • Identify points, lines, and line segments.
    • Relate spatial relationships to symmetry.
    • Find area of a square counting square units.
    • Understand that an equilateral triangle has three equal sides.
  • Measure
    • Money: Read and write money amounts using dollar symbols, decimal notations, and cent symbols. Make change for a dollar. Determine money value for a collection of coins and bills to $10.
    • Time: Tell time to the nearest five-minute interval.
    • Temperature: Read temperature on a weather thermometer to the nearest 10 degrees.
    • Select the most appropriate unit of length, mass, and capacity. Measure to nearest inch or centimeter.
  • Identify and Use Fractions
    • Identify fractional parts of a region (denominators through 10) using >, <, or =.
    • Compare two fractions representing shaded regions or sets.
    • Identify fractions such as 3/3, 4/4, and 10/10 as equal to 1.
  • Solve Problems
    • Find the missing subtrahend or factor.
    • Identify information not needed to solve a problem.
    • Solve one-step word problems involving addition and subtraction of numbers up to 3 digits.
    • Solve one-step word problems involving multiplicationof a 1- or 2-digit number by a 1-digit number.
  • Analyze and Use Charts, Graphs, and Tables
    • Construct a simple bar graph or picture graph.
    • Interpret picture and bar graphs.
    • Solve problems with graphs (picture, bar, or table).

Language Arts

  • Use Language Mechanics and Expression Appropriately
    • Improve use of manuscript in the first six weeks.
    • Use basic strokes of cursive style to form letters and words legibly and neatly.
    • Identify complete sentences.
    • Arrange words in logical order to form sentences.
    • Identify correct use of (and use) periods, question marks, and exclamation points.
    • Identify correct use of and use commas in dates, cities, and states.
    • Use the apostrophe to form contractions and possessives.
    • Identify correct use of singular and plural nouns.
    • Identify correct capitalization of proper nouns, the first word or a sentence, the pronoun “I,” addresses and dates.
    • Recognize the simple subject and simple predicate of a sentence.
    • Recognize and use correct forms of regular verbs (present and past tense).
    • Select words that add detail to sentences.
    • Compose a simple, original paragraph.
    • Recognize parts of a friendly letter.
    • Write abbreviations of commonly used words.
    • Write creatively about selected subjects.
  • Spell and Read
    • Spell words in isolation and in sentence dictation.
    • Recognize and spell the basic Dolch sight words.
    • Use these steps to master spelling: look at the word, sound the word, spell the word, write the word.
    • Recognize correctly spelled words using sound or symbol relationships (blends, long and short vowels, vowel diphthongs.
    • Use and understand the use of antonyms, synonyms, homonyms, and words that rhyme.
    • Identify unknown records through context clues.
    • Identify correctly spelled prefixes and suffixes and base words.
    • Form new words using prefixes and suffixes.
    • Easily read words with irregularly spelled suffixes (-ous, -ion, -ive).
    • Identify correctly spelled contractions.
    • Recognize letter-sound relationships for long vowels.
    • Recognize letter-sound relationships for two-letter consonant blends in the initial and final position (sc, sp, sk, sm, sn, st).
    • Recognize letter-sound relationships for three-letter consonant blends in the initial position (spl, str, spr, scr).
    • Recognize letter-sound associations for vowel digraphs (ai, ay, ee, ea).
    • Recognize letter-sound associations for vowel diphthongs (oi, oy, oo).
    • Use spelling patterns as clues to vowel sounds in words.
    • Differentiate between hard and soft sounds of c and g.
    • Divide two-=syllable words into syllables using the VC CV rule.
  • Develop Listening Comprehension
    • Read to gain pleasure, answer questions, and predict outcomes.
    • Recall story details of material read.
    • Respond to questions on who, what, when, where, or why after reading a selection.
    • Identify and describe the characters of stories.
    • Predict the events in a story.
    • Identify relevant and irrelevant information in a paragraph.
    • Differentiate between possible and impossible situations.
    • Read selected material to:
      • Use context to select from given predictions.
      • Use context to select from possible conclusions.
      • Distinguish between fact and fiction.
      • Identify cause and effect.
      • Sequence events.
      • Identify the main idea (stated).
  • Develop Study Skills
    • Use guide words to find words and entries in a dictionary.
    • Locate the page on which a story begins by using the table of contents.
    • Arrange words in alphabetical order to the second letter.
    • Use a glossary.
    • Classify and categorize words.
    • Locate the title, author, and illustrator on the title page.
  • Develop Independent Reading and Writing Skills
    • Read 30 chapter books a year, independently or with assistance.
    • Discuss books regularly with another student or group.
      • Compare two books by the same author.
      • Talk about several books on the same theme.
      • Refer explicitly to parts of the text when presenting or defending a claim.
      • Discuss why an author might have chosen particular words.
      • Politely disagree when appropriate
      • Ask other questions that seek elaboration and justification.
      • Attempt to explain why their interpretation of a book is valid.
      • Say how a story relates to something in real-life experience.
      • Discuss plot, setting, and motives of characters.
    • Read multiple books by the same author and be able to identify differences and similarities among them.
    • Reread some favorite books or parts of longer books, gaining deeper comprehension and knowledge of the author’s craft.
    • Read things that they or classmates have written.
    • Read functional and instructional messages in the classroom.
    • Infer the meaning of words from roots, prefixes and suffixes, as well as from the overall contextual meaning of what they are reading.
    • Learn new words every day from their reading.
    • Write daily, generating topics and content for their writing.
      • Write stories, memoirs, poems, songs.
      • Write a basic book or movie review.
      • Write basic instructions.
      • Extend and rework pieces of writing.
    • Solicit and provide responses to writing.
    • Revise, edit, and proofread as appropriate.
    • Polish at least 10-12 pieces throughout the year for an audience beyond the classroom.
    • Incorporate drawings, diagrams, or other graphics with their text.
    • Role-play something they have written.
    • Produce writing that uses the full range of words in their vocabulary.
    • Incorporate transitional words and phrases appropriate to thinking, and embed phrases and modifiers that make their writing lively and graphic.

Science

  • Geology
    • Recognize where the earth is on the solar system and understand that it is our home planet.
    • Understand that the planets rotate.
    • Know the terms clouds, sun, moon, and stars.
    • Know what a fossil is and that it provides information about the past.
    • Understand the process of evaporation.
    • Biology—Humans, Animals, Plants
      • Humans
        • Understand the general functions of the heart, lungs, brain, and stomach.
        • Know how to properly care for your body.
        • Understand what good nutrition is and what food item fits into which food group.
        • Animals
        • Differentiate between living and non-living things.
        • Understand that animals are living things with specific needs and characteristics.
        • Identify an animal that hibernates and a nocturnal animal.
        • Plants
          • Understand that plants are living things with specific needs and characteristics.
          • Realize that all living things grow and develop.
          • Identify a living thing that can grow from a seed.
          • Label the parts of a plant.
    • Physical Science
      • Understand different states of matter (solid, liquid, gas)
      • Know that heat, light, and energy come from the sun.
      • Understand that scientists work by using experiments.
      • Understand the concept of weight.
      • Know the use of basic household appliances.
      • Recognize that machines can be useful, but they can also be dangerous.
      • Understand that matter exists in various states and has identifiable properties.
    • Study Skills
      • Analyze a simple bar graph.
      • Predict results of water evaporation.
      • Determine the sequence of events in space.

Social Studies

  • Geography
    • Be familiar with the Globe and World Map.
    • Be able to locate land masses and bodies of water.
    • Realize there are seven main bodies of land on earth and identify these continents by name.
    • Recognize major characteristics of each continent and how geography affected early settlements.
    • Identify the United States on a World Map and your state on a US map.
    • Know directions on a globe or a map, recognizing symbols.
  • History
    • Understand that people were here on earth long ago.
    • Recognize that people have different religious beliefs.
    • Understand how communication and travel has developed and improved through history.
    • Know about the pilgrims.
    • Understand American history as it relates to the holidays (e.g. Why do we celebrate the Fourth of July?) and the development of the US flag.
    • Sequence historical periods by clothing or transportation.
    • Develop an appreciation for other cultures.
  • Political Science
    • Compare and contrast neighborhoods and discuss the needs and responsibilities of living in a neighborhood.
    • Discuss what rights people have.
    • Identify occupations in the community.
    • Understand the role of culture to a neighborhood.
    • Understand the effect of environment on jobs.
    • Recognize services provided by workers.
  • Psychology/Sociology
    • Understand the uses and rules of communication.
    • Understand the role of language in communication.
    • Recognize the importance of communication to people all over the world.
    • Discuss various groups and how or why they are formed.
    • Discuss what it means to be a good neighbor or good citizen.
    • Learn to get along with age-mates of both genders.
    • Learn the appropriate social role of males and females.
    • Begin to develop an understanding of morals and values, right and wrong.
    • Possess a wholesome attitude toward oneself.

Computer Technology

  • Understand the nature and operation of computer systems
    • Identify the functions of computer components.
    • Use input devices, such as mouse, keyboard, and voice/sound recorder.
    • Use output devices, such as disk drive, printer, multimedia projector/display screen, etc.
    • Save, retrieve, and delete files.
    • Describe the purposes of drives, directories, and files.
    • Be aware that there are different types of files (extensions).
  • Use technology proficiently
    • Use and apply appropriate computer terminology.
    • Demonstrate the proper sequence of steps to operate a computer.
    • Identify the file extension for word processing, spreadsheet, and database files.
    • Save to a specific directory or drive.
    • Expand the use of various operating system features such as, opening

more than one application/program, the menus, the taskbar, etc.

  • Develop Basic Skills
    • Exhibit proper posture and fingering techniques for the alphanumeric keyboard.
    • Review and expand proper touch-keying techniques for the home row, top row (Q,W,E,R,T,Y,U,I,O,P,[,],\), bottom (Z,X,C,V,B,N,M, “,”,”.”).
    • Continue practice using the shift keys.
    • Apply the touch-keying system to develop basic skills on the alphanumeric keyboard at a rate of 10 gross words per minute.
    • Key at a rate of 10 gross words per minute using the proper touch-keying techniques.
    • Use keyboards and other common input and output devices (including adaptive devices when necessary) efficiently and effectively.
    • Discuss common uses of technology in daily life and the advantages and disadvantages those uses provide
  • Understand ethical, cultural and societal issues surrounding technology
    • Describe the role of machines in assisting man
    • Identify the various people involved in technological developments.
    • Identify historical aspects of technology.
    • Distinguish between human capabilities and computer capabilities
    • Discuss copyright laws.
    • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology.
    • Adhere to software licensing agreements and respect the electronic work of other individuals.
    • Obey the copyright laws.
    • Follow Acceptable Use Guidelines as set by local school district.
    • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology
    • Cite sources of information (print and non-print) for class assignments.
  • Use technological tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
    • Discuss the reasons computers are best suited for task requiring speed, accuracy, and repeated operations.
    • Use the computer and technology resources as a learning tool.
    • Use the computer and technology resources as a writing tool.
    • Use paint and draw tools to create graphics.
    • Import graphics from clip art galleries.
    • Create slide shows.
    • Use on-line help and documentation (help buttons/menus/guides, readme files, Ask an Expert web sites, electronic tech support).
    • Use the computer and technology resources to practice learning skills in relation to other subject areas such as math, science, English, etc.
    • Use text, paint, and/or drawing tools to create simple documents.
    • Recognize that different software programs are design for specific purposes.
    • Recognize the characteristics of multimedia (text, audio, images, video, etc.).
    • Identify and discuss multimedia terms/concepts (slide/card, link/button, text box, navigate, transition) as a class/group.
    • Create a simple graph/chart from data in a spreadsheet.
    • Explore the navigation of software utilized in the classroom.
  • Use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.
    • Use the computer and technology resources to practice learning skills in relation to other subject areas such as math, science, English, etc.
    • Use text, paint, and/or drawing tools to create simple documents.
    • Recognize that different software programs are design for specific purposes.
    • Recognize the characteristics of multimedia (text, audio, images, video, etc.).
    • Identify and discuss multimedia terms/concepts (slide/card, link/button, text box, navigate, transition) as a class/group.
    • Create a simple graph/chart from data in a spreadsheet.
    • Explore the navigation of software utilized in the classroom.
  • Use a variety of media to effectively communicate to multiple audiences.
    • Explore principals design (proportion, balance, contrast, rhythm, emphasis, unity, etc., in creating a presentation/document.
    • Use appropriate applications, including, but not limited to spreadsheets and databases to develop charts and graphs by using data from various sources.
    • Publish information in a variety of media including, but not limited to, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video.
    • Use presentation software to communicate with specific audiences.
    • Integrate various media (video tape, CD-ROM, laserdisc, digital sources, internet, etc. in a multimedia presentation.
    • Select representative student products to be collected and stored in an electronic evaluation tool.
    • Evaluate student products for relevance to the assignment or task.
    • Be aware that file size is important, plan, organize and save multimedia files with attention to file size and media storage.
  • Use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources.
    • Perform simple searches to acquire information
    • Select appropriate strategies to navigate and access information on local area networks (printer, local servers, CD-ROM towers…) and wide area networks (Internet, WWW, telecommunications…) for research and resource sharing
    • Use electronic reference materials including encyclopedias, thesauruses, dictionaries, maps and atlases, etc.
    • Use an electronic library to search for information related to a project (TEL).
  • Use technology tools to process data and report results.
    • Use electronic reference tools as a resource, such as a simple database/spreadsheet
    • Identify the need for data to be organized.
    • Develop a small basic data base.
    • Identify advantages and disadvantages of a data base.
    • Demonstrate the process through which computers search, sort, delete, update and summarize data.
    • Develop a small basic spreadsheet.
    • Use the computer as a writing tool.
    • Choose an application based on its appropriateness for specific tasks.
    • Evaluate acquired information for usefulness.
    • Explore the gathering of information using a variety of electronic resources, including but not limited to the Internet.
    • Perform an Internet search under the direction and supervision of a teacher.
    • Use interactive technology environments, such as simulations, electronic science or mathematics laboratories, virtual museum field trips, or on-line interactive lessons to extend learning.
  • Employ technology resources for problem solving and decision making.
    • Recognize that computers were created to assist in solving problems. (Computer History)
    • Recognize that the computer relies on sequential steps in order to perform tasks.
    • Use a step-by-step process for solving a problem.
      • Order specific steps in the solution of a problem.
      • Choose the proper steps in the solution of a problem.
      • Choose and order the steps in the solution of a problem
    • Use teacher selected websites to acquire information related to a given problem.
      • Analyze the information gathered
      • Collaborate with the teacher/student to reach a decision based on the information gathered.
    • Use the computer and technology resources to gather information on different ways to solve a specific problem.
    • Use developmentally appropriate software to follow sequential directions and proper steps to solve a problem for a given simple task.
    • Use multimedia software to express ideas, strategies use, and solution for a given problem and/or task.
    • Use some method of storyboarding to create a presentation on the steps used to solve the problem.
    • Perform an Internet search under the direction and supervision of a teacher.
    • Use interactive technology environments, such as simulations, electronic science or mathematics laboratories, virtual museum field trips, or on-line interactive lessons to extend learning.

The technology portion of the basic skills for third grade comes from:

http://www.tennessee.gov/education/ci/computer/grade_3.pdf

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