No Angry Breakfast: Tips for kids with ADD or Strong Wills

Tip of the Week

If you have a child with ADD/ADHD (or a strong-will), you might want to try this out. Mornings tend to be difficult for my daughter. She can’t take her medicine until she eats, she’s often not hungry first thing, and her lack of focus and impulsivity seem to sky-rocket. I usually try to offer her choices (as she doesn’t like when I make the choice for her) but she seems unable to make a choice. So, just this past week we’ve tried an experiment. She chooses clothes the night before and sets them out. Also, I put a chart on the refrigerator that offers her 5 different breakfast options. Before she goes to bed (or during dinner time) she places a ladybug magnet on the option she would like to have.  This has worked well all week! She makes the choices and is in control, yet she is not having to make the choices at a time that can be very difficult for her.

If you have a similar tip that has worked for you, please leave a comment below.

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Here is an article about the use of stability (yoga) balls instead of chairs to help kids focus. Check it out! http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-11-03/features/os-school-yoga-balls-lake-20131103_1_stability-balls-john-kilbourne-lake-teacher

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Struggling with whether or not to medicate? Please read this post by a fellow blogger:

Making the Choice to Medicate Your Child – The Chaos and the Clutter

 

 

Education, Homeschool, Gap Year

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5 thoughts on “No Angry Breakfast: Tips for kids with ADD or Strong Wills

  1. Pingback: Homeschooling Children with ADD/ADHD and/or ODD | The Education Cafe

  2. Pingback: ADD and Things Kids Say | The Education Cafe

  3. Pingback: ADD and Things Kids Say | The Education Cafe

  4. Pingback: 7 Tips for Parenting a Strong-Willed Child « Delana's World

  5. That’s a great idea. I’m all for avoiding conflict with children when they’re feeling overwhelmed, but also believe parents need to be a strong skeleton of structure for them. I can see how this would work.

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